Irish Explorer Tour (9 day/8 night or 10 day/9 night)

Your Escorted Coach Tour of Ireland Includes

9 days/8 nights/15 meals or 10 days/9 nights/16 meals

 

  • Sightseeing by luxury coach
  • Professional driver/guide
  • 8/9 nights in hotels listed
  • Full breakfast daily (B) except on day 1
  • 7 dinners (D) including
  • - Welcome dinner at Clontarf Castle Hotel
  • - Nancy’s Restaurant in Ardara
  • - Abbey Tavern traditional Irish dinner/show
  • - 4 table d'hote dinners
  • 2 lunches (L)
  • Welcome get-together drink
  • Tour of Dublin with a local guide
  • Slieve League sea cliffs followed by home-baked scones with coffee or tea
  • Storytelling session in Donegal
  • Dan O’Hara’s Homestead Farm
  • Walking tour of Galway with a local guide
  • Sheepdog trials on Ring of Kerry
  • Dublin open-top bus tour with a visit to Guinness Storehouse or General Post Office
  • Visits and admissions to Glasnevin Museum, Ulster American Folk Park, Donegal Castle, Triona Design, Belleek Pottery Factory, W. B. Yeats’ Grave, Lissadell House, Connemara Celtic Crystal Factory, Cliffs of Moher, Foynes Flying Boat Museum, Skellig Experience, Blarney Castle and Blarney Woollen Mills
  • Headsets for walking tours
  • Deluxe carry-on backpack, ticket wallet, luggage tags & strap
  • All local taxes, hotel service charges & porterage for one suitcase per person
  • Free Wi-Fi on coaches and in hotel lobbies


Your Hotels

Stay at the following (or similar):

  • Clontarf Castle Hotel, Dublin (1 night)
  • Mill Park Hotel, Donegal (2 nights)
  • Meyrick Hotel,Galway (2 nights) (Castlecourt Hotel, Westport for JUl 26 departure)
  • Killarney Avenue Hotel, Killarney (2 nights)
  • Herbert Park Hotel, Dublin (1 or 2 nights)

Tour Highlights

Slieve League

Slieve League

One of Ireland’s must see attractions, Slieve League Cliffs also known in irish as Sliabh Liag, situated on the southwest coast of Donegal, are said to be the highest and one of the finest marine cliffs in Europe.   To fully enjoy the spectacle of Slieve League it is best to leave your car at the car park and walk the few miles to the cliffs so as not to miss the exciting scenery of the area. There are terrific views of the Atlantic Ocean, the Sligo Mountains and Donegal Bay as you walk towards the terrifyingly high top of Slieve League where the cliff face of Bunglas rises over 600m above the raging ocean. Experienced walkers only should venture beyond the viewing point onto One Man's Pass which loops around onto the Pilgrim's Path. Be sure to take in the Slieve League Mountain...read more

Ring of Kerry

Ring of Kerry

Admire breathtaking vistas of mountains, cliffs and beaches on Ireland’s most popular drive, the 100-mile Ring of Kerry. Starting from Killarney, heading around the Iveragh Peninsula and passing through Kenmare, Sneem, Waterville (favourite holiday spot of Charlie Chaplin that now has a statue of him to commemorate his love of the place), Cahersiveen and Killorglin. Popular points include Muckross House (near Killarney), Staigue stone fort and Derrynane House, home of Daniel O'Connell. Just south of Killarney, Ross Castle, Lough Leane, and Ladies View (a panoramic viewpoint), all located within Killarney National Park, are major attractions located along the Ring. The complete list of major attractions along the Ring of Kerry includes: Gap of Dunloe, Bog Village, Rossbeigh B...read more

Glasnevin Cemetery & Museum

Glasnevin Cemetery & Museum

Glasnevin Cemetery is the largest cemetery in Ireland and was first opened in 1832. It was established as a place where people of all religions and none could bury their dead with dignity; the cemetery has grown to become a national monument and is a vital part of the Irish Heritage story. Glasnevin Museum is a must see for anyone interested in Irish Heritage and Genealogy. The exhibitions over two floors, shows the social, historical, political and artistic development of modern Ireland through the lives of the generations buried in Ireland’s necropolis. The tour includes a visit the crypt of Daniel O Connell. Other Museum facilities include the Tower Cafe which offers a wide and varied menu and the Glasnevin Trust Shop which stocks exclusive gifts and souvenirs. Glasnevin...read more

Connemara National Park

Connemara National Park

Connemara National Park (Irish: Páirc Naisiúnta Chonamara) is one of six National Parks in Ireland that are managed by the National Parks and Wildlife Service of the Department of the Environment, Heritage and local government. It is located in the west of Ireland within County Galway. Connemara National Park was founded and opened to the public in 1980. It features 29.57 square kilometres of mountains, bogs, heaths, grasslands and forests. The entrance is situated on the Clifden side of Letterfrack. There are many remnants of human civilization within the park. There is a 19th century graveyard as well as 4,000 year old megalithic court tombs. Much of the land was once part of the Kylemore Abbey estate. Western blanket bog and heathland are the most common vegetation of Conn...read more

Cliffs of Moher

Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher (Irish: Aillte an Mhothair, lit. cliffs of the ruin, also known as the Cliffs of Coher from the Irish: Mhothair) are located in the parish of Liscannor at the south-western edge of The Burren area near Doolin, which is located in County Clare, Ireland. The cliffs rise 120 meters (394 ft) above the Atlantic Ocean at Hag's Head, and reach their maximum height of 214 meters (702 ft) just north of O'Brien's Tower, eight kilometres away. The cliffs boast one of Ireland's most spectacular views. On a clear day the Aran Islands are visible in Galway Bay, as are the valleys and hills of Connemara. O'Brien's Tower is a round stone tower at the approximate midpoint of the cliffs. It was built by Sir Cornelius O'Brien, a descendant of Ireland's High King Brian Boru, in 18...read more

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle is a medieval stronghold in Blarney, near Cork, Ireland. It is near the River Martin. The castle originally dates from before AD 1200. It was destroyed in 1446, but subsequently rebuilt by Cormac MacCarthy, the King of Munster. It is currently a partial ruin with some accessible rooms and the battlements. There are many legends as to the origin of the stone, but some say that it was the Lia Fáil—a magical stone upon which Irish kings were crowned.The Blarney Stone is a block of bluestone built into the battlements of Blarney Castle, Blarney about 8 km from Cork, Ireland. According to legend, kissing the stone endows the kisser with the gift of gab (great eloquence or skill at flattery). The stone was set into a tower of the castle in 1446. The castle ...read more

Rock of Cashel

Rock of Cashel

The Rock of Cashel, also known as Cashel of the Kings and St. Patrick's Rock, is a historic site in Ireland's province of Munster, located at Cashel, County Tipperary. The Rock of Cashel served as the traditional seat of the Kings of Munster for several hundred years prior to the Norman invasion, though few remnants if any of the early structures survive. The majority of buildings on the current site date from the 12th and 13th centuries. Cashel is reputed to be the site of the conversion of the King of Munster by St. Patrick in the 5th century A.D. The buildings which crown the Rock of Cashel present a mass and outline of great complexity, rivalling other sites in western Europe. The complex has a character of its own, unique and native, and is one of the most remarkable collec...read more

Dublin

Dublin

Dublin is both the largest city and capital of Ireland. It is located near the midpoint of Ireland's east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and at the centre of the Dublin Region. Founded as a Viking settlement, the city has been Ireland's primary city for most of the island's history since medieval times. Today, it is an economic, administrative and cultural centre for the island of Ireland and has one of the fastest growing populations of any European capital city. The city has a world-famous literary history, having produced many prominent literary figures, including Nobel laureates William Butler Yeats, George Bernard Shaw and Samuel Beckett. Other influential writers and playwrights from Dublin include Oscar Wilde, Jonathan Swift and the creator of Dracula, Bram Stoker. It is ar...read more