Northern Welcome Tour (8 day/7 night or 9 day/8 night)

Your Escorted Coach Tour of Ireland Includes

8 days/7 nights/14 meals or 9 days/8 nights/15 meals

  • Sightseeing by luxury coach
  • Professional driver/guide
  • 7 or 8 nights in hotels listed
  • Full breakfast daily (B) except on day 1
  • 6 dinners (D) including
    - Welcome dinner in Cabra Castle
    - Merry Ploughboy Pub dinner and traditional show- 4 table d'hote dinners
  • 1 lunch (L)
  • Welcome get-together drink
  • Tour of Belfast with a local guide
  • Sheans Heritage Farm turf-cutting, tea and scones
  • Walking tours of Derry and Galway
  • Irish coffee on Inishowen Peninsula
  • Day tour to Achill Island
  • Tour of Dublin with visit to Glasnevin Museum
  • Dublin open-top bus tour with a visit to Guinness Storehouse or General Post Office
  • Visits and admissions to Down Cathedral, St. Patrick Centre, Titanic Belfast, Giant’s Causeway, Donegal Castle, Belleek Pottery Factory, W. B. Yeats’ Grave, Westport House and Kilbeggan Distillery Experience
  • Headsets for walking tours
  • Deluxe carry-on backpack, ticket wallet, luggage tags & strap
  • All local taxes, hotel service charges & porterage for one suitcase per person
  • Free Wi-Fi on coaches and in hotel lobbies

 

Your Hotels

  • Cabra Castle Hotel, Kingscourt (1 night) 
  • Europa Hotel - Belfast, Belfast (1 night)
  • Maldron Hotel, Derry (2 nights)
  • Clew Bay Hotel, Westport (2 nights)
  • The Talbot Hotel, Dublin (1 or 2 nights)

Tour Highlights

Guinness Storehouse

Guinness Storehouse

The Guinness Storehouse is located in the heart of the St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, and is, according to the Guiness Storehouse Web site, Ireland’s No. 1 international visitor attraction. Since opening in November 2000, Guinness Storehouse has attracted over 4 million visitors from every corner of the globe. The Storehouse is laid out over seven floors surrounding a glass atrium taking the shape of a pint of Guinness. On the ground floor the massive exhibit introduces you to the four ingredients; water, barley, hops and yeast, all of which combine together to make a pint of Guinness. Visitors are also introduced to the fifth and vital ingredient, Arthur Guinness himself. As the visitor moves up through the building, they next encounter an exhibition on the history of...read more

Titanic Belfast

Titanic Belfast

Titanic Belfast is an unbelievable, unmissable experience. Located in the heart of Belfast, right beside the historic site of this world-famous ship’s construction, Titanic Belfast is the world’s largest Titanic visitor experience. Housed in an iconic, six-floor building and extending over nine galleries, this state-of-the-art visitor experience tells the story of the Titanic, from her conception in Belfast in the early 1900s, through her construction and launch, to her famous maiden voyage and subsequent place in history. Titanic Belfast tells this world-famous story using contemporary interactive technology, special effects and even a thrilling shipyard ride where you will hear the sound of riveting and experience the smells of melting steel as you journey through what it was like to be a shipyard worker in Belfast more than 100 years ago....read more

Glens of Antrim

Glens of Antrim

The Glens of Antrim are naturally unique - within twenty or so square miles you can enjoy a variations in natural landscape that includes glacial valleys, sandy beaches, vertical cliffs, tundra plateau, wooded glens, waterfalls and picturesque villages. Ancient sites and places of intrigue abound! Comprising nine glens, or valleys, that radiate from the Antrim Plateau to the coast. The inhabitants of the several glens are descended primarily from native Irish and Hebridean Scots. The Glens are an area of outstanding natural beauty and are a major tourist attraction in north Antrim. Principal towns in the Glens are Ballycastle, Cushendun, Cushendall, Waterfoot and Carnlough. Beginning with Glentaisie on the western side of Knocklayde, next in line of the glens comes Glenshesk on ...read more

Donegal Castle

Donegal Castle

Built by the O Donnell chieftains in the 15th century on the river Eske at the centre of Donegal Town. Rebuilt in Jacobean style in 16th century by Sir Basil Brooke after Hugh O Donnell burnt it to the ground rather than let the castle fall to enemy hands. Information panels chronicle the history of the castle and guided tours are available. The castle opens each season from mid March to the end of October. Donegal (Irish, Dún na nGall), translates as Fort of the Foreigner possibly coming from a Viking fortress in the area destroyed in 1159. However, due to hundreds of years of development, no archaeological evidence of this early fortress has been found. The elder Sir Hugh O’Donnell, wealthy chief of the O’Donnell clan, built the castle in 1474. At the same ti...read more

Achill Island

Achill Island

Travel across the Curraun Peninsula to reach Achill Island, joined to the mainland by bridge.The parish of Achill includes Achill Island and parts of the Currane Peninsula in County Mayo on the west coast of Ireland. This area is steeped in history and, despite its remote location, has produced or attracted a rich array of famous people and fascinating characters. The area hosts a wide variety of flora and fauna, as well as some of the most spectacular scenery in the country. With its Atlantic location, five Blue Flag beaches and breathtaking mountain landscape, Achill provides an unrivalled arena for outdoor activities and watersports of all types. Achill's romantic setting has also proved to be an inspirational creative retreat for artists and writers including Paul Henry, Hei...read more

Galway

Galway

Galway is the only city in the province of Connacht in Ireland. In Irish, Galway is also called Cathair na Gaillimhe: "City of Galway". Galway city also has a reputation amongst Irish cities for being associated with the Irish language, music, song and dancing traditions - it is sometimes referred to as the 'Bilingual Capital of Ireland'. The city takes its name from the Gaillimh river (River Corrib) that formed the western boundary of the earliest settlement, which was called Dún Bhun na Gaillimhe, or the fort at the bottom of the Gaillimh. The word Gaillimh means "stony" as in "stony river". (the mythical and alternative derivations are given in History of Galway.) The city also bears the nickname City of the Tribes / Cathair na dTreabh, because fourteen[1] “Tribe...read more