Literary Tours of Ireland

Below, you will find a list of the major touring attractions that exist in the areas of Ireland that you will be traveling through on your Literary Tours of Ireland. While these attractions are on your tour route, the beauty of our 8 night group tour of Ireland is that you can choose which of the attractions you wish to see. If there are attractions that you wish to include on your tour of Ireland but are not listed below, make sure to mention this to your dedicated tour advisor.

Aran Islands

Aran Islands

The Aran Islands are a group of three islands located at the mouth of Galway Bay, on the west coast of Ireland. The largest island is Inishmore; the middle and second-largest is Inishmaan and the smallest and most eastern is Inisheer. Irish is a spoken language on all three islands, and is the language used naming the islands and their villages and townlands. Take a short ferry ride to Inis Mor, the largest of the three Aran Islands, and island rich in the language, culture and heritage of Ireland, unique in its geology and archaeology and in its long tradition of gentle hospitality. Here is a place to sense the spirit of Gaelic Ireland, to touch the past, but with all the comforts and facilities of the present. Aran will take you back to an Ireland of Celts and Early Christians....read more

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle is a medieval stronghold in Blarney, near Cork, Ireland. It is near the River Martin. The castle originally dates from before AD 1200. It was destroyed in 1446, but subsequently rebuilt by Cormac MacCarthy, the King of Munster. It is currently a partial ruin with some accessible rooms and the battlements. There are many legends as to the origin of the stone, but some say that it was the Lia Fáil—a magical stone upon which Irish kings were crowned.The Blarney Stone is a block of bluestone built into the battlements of Blarney Castle, Blarney about 8 km from Cork, Ireland. According to legend, kissing the stone endows the kisser with the gift of gab (great eloquence or skill at flattery). The stone was set into a tower of the castle in 1446. The castle is a popular tourist site in Ireland, attracting visitors from all over the world to kiss the Stone and tour the castle and its gardens....read more

Burren

Burren

The Burren is a unique karst-landscape region in northwest County Clare, in Ireland and one of the largest Karst landscapes in Europe. The region measures approximately 250 square kilometres and is enclosed roughly within the circle comprised by the villages Ballyvaughan, Kinvara, Tubber, Corofin, Kilfenora and Lisdoonvarna, It is bounded by the Atlantic and Galway Bay on the west and north respectively. Strictly speaking the territory of the Burren or barony of Burren only contains the villages of Lisdoonvarna, Ballyvaughan, Fanore, Craggagh, New Quay/Burrin, Bealaclugga (Bellharbour) and Carron. The definite article (making it "the Burren") has only been added to the name in the last few decades, possibly by academics, as it had always been called Boireann in Irish and Burren i...read more

Cliffs of Moher

Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher (Irish: Aillte an Mhothair, lit. cliffs of the ruin, also known as the Cliffs of Coher from the Irish: Mhothair) are located in the parish of Liscannor at the south-western edge of The Burren area near Doolin, which is located in County Clare, Ireland. The cliffs rise 120 meters (394 ft) above the Atlantic Ocean at Hag's Head, and reach their maximum height of 214 meters (702 ft) just north of O'Brien's Tower, eight kilometres away. The cliffs boast one of Ireland's most spectacular views. On a clear day the Aran Islands are visible in Galway Bay, as are the valleys and hills of Connemara. O'Brien's Tower is a round stone tower at the approximate midpoint of the cliffs. It was built by Sir Cornelius O'Brien, a descendant of Ireland's High King Brian Boru, in 18...read more

Cobh Heritage Centre

Cobh Heritage Centre

The Cobh Heritage Centre provides information on life in Ireland through the 18th and 19th centuries, the mass emigration, the Great Famine, and on how criminals were transported to Australia for petty crimes. It also has an exhibition on the history of the RMS Titanic, whose last port of call before it sank was Cóbh (then Queenstown). From 1848 - 1950 over 6 million adults and children emigrated from Ireland - over 2.5 million departed from Cobh, making it the single most important port of emigration. This exodus from Ireland was largely as a result of poverty, crop failures, the land system and a lack of opportunity. Irish emigration reached unprecedented proportions during the famine as people fled from hunger and disease. Many famine emigrants went initially to British ...read more

Dublinia

Dublinia

Dublinia, located at the crossroads of the medieval city at Christchurch, is history brought to life in an exciting way for all to engage, learn and share. Go back to Viking times in Dublin –what was life really like onboard a Viking warship? See their weaponry and the skills of being a Viking warrior. Try on Viking clothes, become a slave and stroll down a noisy street. Visit a smokey and cramped Viking house. Learn of the myths and the mysteries surrounding the Vikings and their legacy....read more

Dun Aengus

Dun Aengus

Dún Aengus is the most famous of several prehistoric forts on the Aran Islands, of Co. Galway. Ireland. It is located on Inishmore at the edge of a 100-metre high cliff. Dún Aengus is an important archaeological site that also offers a spectacular view. It was built during the Bronze Age and dates from 1,000 B.C. or before. It has been called "the most magnificent barbaric monument in Europe." The name "Dún Aengus" meaning "Fort of Aengus" refers to the pre-Christian god of the same name described in Irish mythology. The fort consists of a series of four concentric walls of dry stone construction. Surviving stonework is four metres wide at some points. The original shape was presumably oval or D-shaped but part of the cliff and fort have since collapsed into ...read more

Dunbrody Famine Ship

Dunbrody Famine Ship

The Dunbrody is a full-scale reconstruction of a 19th Century Famine ship, and authentic replica of the Three Masted Barque built in Quebec in 1845 for the Graves family of New Ross. Board the Dunbrody and walk in the footsteps of a group of Irish famine emigrants on their journey of hope across the Atlantic Ocean. Go below deck and enter the confined spaces, which would be home for passengers and crew for the 45-day voyage. Descend into the cargo hold where the exhibition describes the endurance, struggle and triumph over adversity of those 19th Century emigrants as epitomised by the story of the most famous emigrant sons of New Ross, President John F. Kennedy. These passengers were people desperate to escape the famine conditions in Ireland at the time and conditions for steer...read more

Glendalough

Glendalough

Glendalough (Irish: Gleann Dá Loch, meaning Glen of Two Lakes) is a glacial valley located in County Wicklow, Ireland, renowned for its Early Medieval monastic settlement founded in the 6th century by St Kevin, a hermit priest, and destroyed in 1398 by English troops. History of Glendalough Kevin, a descendant of one of the ruling families in Leinster, studied as a boy under the care of three holy men, Eoghan, Lochan, and Eanna. During this time, he went to Glendalough. He was to return later, with a small group of monks to found a monastery where the 'two rivers form a confluence'. His fame as a holy man spread and he attracted numerous followers. He died in about 618. For six centuries afterwards, Glendalough flourished and the Irish Annals contain references to the deat...read more

Hook Lighthouse Centre

Hook Lighthouse Centre

The Hook Lighthouse (also know as Hook Head Lighthouse) is situated at the tip of the Hook Peninsula in County Wexford, in Ireland, is one of the oldest lighthouses in the world. Operated by the Commissioners of Irish Lights, the Irish Lighthouse Authority, the Hook marks the eastern entrance to Waterford Harbour History The existing tower dates from the twelfth century, though tradition states that Dubhan, a missionary to the Wexford area, established some sort of beacon as early as the 5th century. The exact circumstance of the initial construction on the present structure are the subject of some controversy. It had been thought that the tower was constructed in 1172 by Raymond LeGros as part of his conquests in Ireland, both to establish the lighthouse and to serve as a fortre...read more

Kilkenny Castle

Kilkenny Castle

Kilkenny Castle (Irish: Caisleán Chill Chainnigh) is a castle in Kilkenny, Ireland. It was the seat of the Butler family. Formerly the family name was FitzWalter. The castle was sold to the local Castle Restoration Committee in the middle of the 20th century for £50. Shortly afterward it was handed over to the State, and has since been refurbished and is open to visitors. Part of the National Art Gallery is on display in the castle. There are ornamental gardens on the city side of the castle, and extensive land and gardens to the front. It has become one of the most visited tourist sites in Ireland. Kilkenny castle was the venue for the meeting of the General Assembly, or parliament, of the Confederate Ireland government in the 1640s. Awards and conferring ceremonies...read more

Titanic Walk

Titanic Walk

The Titanic Trail is a guided tour around the streets and environs of Cobh, revealing locations and incidents directly connected to the Titanic and many other aspects of the port's history. The actual building in which the White Star Line Cobh Oark Office was is visited. The very pier where Titanic passengers departed is seen. St. Colmans Cathedral, the Holy Ground, and the site of the landing of Lusitania victims are all pointed out to the visitor and interspersed with a multitude of emigrant, military and maritime history. The trail brings the whole era of Sailing Ships, departing emigrants (almost 3 million left from Cobh) and great military fleets to life in a way that leaves a lasting impression on the visitor. ...read more

Trinity College & Book of Kells

Trinity College & Book of Kells

Trinity is located in the centre of Dublin, Ireland, on College Green opposite the former Irish Houses of Parliament (now a branch of the Bank of Ireland). The campus occupies 190,000m² (47 acres), with many buildings, both old and new, ranged around large courts (known as "squares") and two playing fields. The Library of Trinity College is a copyright library for Ireland and the United Kingdom, containing over 4.5 million books and significant quantities of maps, manuscripts and music. The Library of Trinity College is the largest research library in Ireland. As a result of its historic standing, Trinity is a legal deposit library (as per Legal Deposit Libraries Act 2003) for the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and has a similar standing in Irish law....read more

Waterford Crystal Centre

Waterford Crystal Centre

The iconic House of Waterford Crystal in the heart of Waterford city, comprises of a brand new manufacturing facility, visitor centre and retail outlet. Visitors can enjoy all aspects of the manufacturing process through the factory tour and learn about both historical and contemporary production techniques through direct interaction with the craftsmen and the audiovisual materials. The manufacturing facility contains a brand new continuous melt tank furnace that has been tailor-made to Waterford Crystal’s specifications, and produces two tonnes of molten crystal every day, which produces 45,000 high-end crystal pieces per year. It uses leading edge technology to deliver molten crystal of the highest quality for skilled master blowers to hand-shape and hand-blow into Water...read more

Avoca Handweavers

Avoca Handweavers

The birthplace of the Avoca experience, and the origin of the company name, Avoca Handweavers, this is a famous tourist destination, as well as a long time favourite among the Dublin and Wicklow communities. Built on the banks of the Avoca River from where it used to draw it's power, you'll find a large Avoca store and cafe, and a working handweaving mill. The mill itself dates from 1723, and is said to be the oldest extant manufacturer in Ireland. Many of the throws, rugs and scarves you'll find in the Avoca stores are woven at this mill. Initially the mill took the raw wool from the sheep of the surrounding hills and valleys and through a process of carding, spinning, dyeing and weaving transformed it into clothing and blankets for barter and sale. Visitors are welcome to see ...read more

Connemara National Park

Connemara National Park

Connemara National Park (Irish: Páirc Naisiúnta Chonamara) is one of six National Parks in Ireland that are managed by the National Parks and Wildlife Service of the Department of the Environment, Heritage and local government. It is located in the west of Ireland within County Galway. Connemara National Park was founded and opened to the public in 1980. It features 29.57 square kilometres of mountains, bogs, heaths, grasslands and forests. The entrance is situated on the Clifden side of Letterfrack. There are many remnants of human civilization within the park. There is a 19th century graveyard as well as 4,000 year old megalithic court tombs. Much of the land was once part of the Kylemore Abbey estate. Western blanket bog and heathland are the most common vegetation of Conn...read more

Galway

Galway

Galway is the only city in the province of Connacht in Ireland. In Irish, Galway is also called Cathair na Gaillimhe: "City of Galway". Galway city also has a reputation amongst Irish cities for being associated with the Irish language, music, song and dancing traditions - it is sometimes referred to as the 'Bilingual Capital of Ireland'. The city takes its name from the Gaillimh river (River Corrib) that formed the western boundary of the earliest settlement, which was called Dún Bhun na Gaillimhe, or the fort at the bottom of the Gaillimh. The word Gaillimh means "stony" as in "stony river". (the mythical and alternative derivations are given in History of Galway.) The city also bears the nickname City of the Tribes / Cathair na dTreabh, because fourteen[1] “Tribe...read more

House of Waterford Crystal

House of Waterford Crystal

The iconic House of Waterford Crystal in the heart of Waterford city, comprises of a brand new manufacturing facility, visitor centre and retail outlet. Visitors can enjoy all aspects of the manufacturing process through the factory tour and learn about both historical and contemporary production techniques through direct interaction with the craftsmen and the audiovisual materials. The manufacturing facility contains a brand new continuous melt tank furnace that has been tailor-made to Waterford Crystal’s specifications, and produces two tonnes of molten crystal every day, which produces 45,000 high-end crystal pieces per year. It uses leading edge technology to deliver molten crystal of the highest quality for skilled master blowers to hand-shape and hand-blow into Waterford Crysta...read more

Kilkenny

Kilkenny

Kilkenny is the county town of County Kilkenny in Ireland. It is situated on both banks of the River Nore, at the centre of County Kilkenny in the province of Leinster in the south-east of Ireland. Kilkenny City is administered by a borough council and has a Mayor. The population of the town and its environs is approximately 25,000. The majority of the population of Kilkenny City live outside the borough boundary. From an ecclesiastical foundation, Kilkenny was the ancient capital of the kingdom of Ossory. The town was established, then a city, in 1609 by royal charter. Kilkenny was the capital of Confederate Ireland between 1642 and 1649. The seat of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Ossory and the Church of Ireland Bishop of Cashel and Ossory are in Kilkenny. Kilkenny is famous for its mediev...read more

Kylemore Abbey

Kylemore Abbey

Visit Kylemore Abbey, a 19th century mansion with an exquisite chapel and reception rooms. The Abbey is the oldest of the Irish Benedictine Abbeys. It is a Benedictine monastery founded in 1920 on the grounds of Kylemore Castle, in Connemara, County Galway, Ireland. The abbey was founded for Benedictine Nuns who fled Belgium in World War I. At Kylemore, the nuns opened their international boarding school and established a day school for local girls. They also ran a farm and guesthouse; the guesthouse was closed after a devastating fire in 1959. A section of the Abbey (the enclosure) is retained strictly for the nuns’ use and is not open to the public; here the nuns devote themselves to their monastic life of prayer and work. Originally called Kylemore Castle, it was built be...read more

National Stud & Japanese Gardens

National Stud & Japanese Gardens

The Irish National Stud (official name: Colucht Groighe Naisiunta na hÉireann Teo (The Irish National Stud Co. Ltd)) is a horse breeding facility based at Tully, Kildare, County Kildare, Ireland. It was formally established by incorporation on 11 April 1946 under the National Stud Act, 1945 and is owned by the Irish Government. The lands around Tully have been associated with the breeding of horses since about 1300, when it is likely that war horses were bred here for the Knights of Malta. However, the first record of the setting up of a stud farm is in 1900, when the lands were purchased from a local farmer James Fay, by Colonel William Hall-Walker, who later became Lord Wavertree. As 'Willie' Walker approached middle age, he turned his attention to the owning and breeding...read more

Powerscourt House & Gardens

Powerscourt House & Gardens

Powerscourt Estate is located near Enniskerry, County Wicklow, Ireland, is a large country estate which is noted for its house and landscaped gardens, today occupying 19 hectares (47 acres). The house, originally a 13th century castle, was extensively altered during the 18th century by German architect Richard Cassels, starting in 1731 and finishing in 1741. A fire in 1974 left the house lying as a shell until it was renovated in 1996. The estate is today owned and run by the Slazenger family. It is a popular tourist attraction, and includes a golf course, an Avoca Handweavers restaurant, and a Ritz-Carlton hotel. The original owner of the 13th century castle was a man by the name of la Poer, which was eventually anglicised to Power. The castle's position was of strategic militar...read more

Skellig Experience

Skellig Experience

The Skellig Islands (Irish: Na Scealaga) are two small, steep and rocky islands lying about 16 km west of Bolus Head on the Iveragh Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland. They are famous for their thriving gannet and puffin populations, and for an early Christian monastery that is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The smaller island is Little Skellig (Sceilig Bheag in Irish). It is closed to the public, and holds Ireland's largest and the world's second-largest Northern Gannet colony, with almost 30,000 pairs. It is about 1.5 km east of Great Skellig. Also known as Skellig Michael (Sceilig Mhichíl in Irish), Great Sceilig is the larger of the two islands, rising to over 230 m above sea level. With a sixth-century Christian monastery perched on a ledge close to the top, Great Skel...read more

The National Wax Museum Plus

The National Wax Museum Plus

The National Wax Museum is a remarkably original attraction, which has been designed to bring a truly interactive experience. Your tour of the museum will take you on a voyage through Irish cultural tradition, through a captivating children’s zone of discovery and Ireland’s only dedicated tribute to our top scientific inventors, a recording studio, a green screen video room and all the exceptional life-like waxwork characters that you would expect to see at The National Wax Museum....read more

Aillwee Cave and the Burren Birds of Prey Centre

Aillwee Cave and the Burren Birds of Prey Centre

The unique karst landscape of the Burren Region is home to Aillwee Cave and the Burren Birds of Prey, located in Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare. This stunning creation of nature was formed by the melt waters of a prehistoric ice age. The cave, carved out of limestone, cuts one third of a mile into the heart of the mountains. The story of Aillwee Cave began millions of years ago when streams sinking underground on Aillwee Mountain started dissolving channels through the lines of weakness in the limestone. About one million years ago the ice age began and from then until fifteen thousand years ago Ireland's climate alternated between arctic coldness and warmer periods, freezing and melting, freezing and melting over the centuries. This melting water roared and crashed its way through the Aillwee Cave greatly enlarging the passage and bringing with it large quantities of sand and silts which are still present in the inner cave. The earliest history of the cave is preserved in its roof. Aillwee is one of the most ancient caves in the Burren and perhaps in Ireland. ...read more

CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory

CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory

CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory - the Space for Science is Cork’s fun and exciting location to learn about the Universe. Today the Castle is a science centre and is home to Cosmos at the Castle, an award winning interactive astronomy exhibition which highlights recent scientific discoveries and their implications for life in outer space....read more

Clifden

Clifden

Clifden is a town on the coast of County Galway, Ireland and being Connemara's largest town, it is often referred to as "the Capital of Connemara". It is located on the Owenglen River where it flows into Clifden Bay, set between the Atlantic Ocean, 12 Ben Mountains and preserved boglands. The town is linked to Galway city by the N59 and is a popular tourist destination for those touring Connemara. An area at long last recognised as a new popular destination and not just a place to 'breeze through'. Enhanced by spectacular scenery, championship golfing, horse-riding, walking, cycling, hill walking, beaches, fishing, scubadiving, painting, national parks, abbeys, castle ruins and over 5,000 years of living history. Peruse the many shopping choices in Clifden from sweater shops, quality gift ...read more

Dalkey Castle & Heritage Centre

Dalkey Castle & Heritage Centre

Dalkey Castle & Heritage Centre is a premier and unique tourist destination in Ireland. A fun day out for all the family. This interactive History tour takes the form of a Live Re-enactment. The actors play their parts and stay in character constantly. All the characters work in Goat Castle (as Dalkey Castle was called then) in the 1500s and 1600s....read more

Dunguaire Castle

Dunguaire Castle

Dunguaire Castle (Irish: Dún Guaire) is a 16th-century tower house on the southeastern shore of Galway Bay in County Galway, Ireland, near Kinvarra. The castle's 75 foot-tower and its defensive wall have been restored to excellent condition, and the grounds are open to tourists during the summer. Dunguaire castle is one of the most visited and photographed castles in the West of Ireland, conveniently located as it is, by the roadside on the way into the picturesque, seaside village of Kinvara. The castle was built by the Hynes clan in 1520, a family who may have been associated with the area since 662, when the site is believed to have once been the royal palace of Guaire Aidhne, the legendary king of Connacht and progenitor of the clan. Dunguaire Castle was transferred in the 17th ...read more

Fota Wildlife Park

Fota Wildlife Park

At Fota Wildlife Park You can come face to face with the animals as they roam freely around the park and see them feeding and foraging for food. Our specially-constructed Cheetah Run is a popular hit as crowds can witness the speed and power that makes the Cheetah such an incredible predator in the wild while they try to catch their prey. The park hosts endangered and exotic species from around the world including giraffes, penguins, zebras, gibbons to name but a few. ...read more

Galway Cathedral

Galway Cathedral

Galway Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St. Nicholas. Perhaps with the hint of a nod to Brunelleschi’s Duomo in Florence, the large octagonal dome of Galway’s Catholic Cathedral rises above the roofs of the medieval city. Providing a full side view to those crossing a bridge over the Corrib, it was the last major stone church to be built in Ireland, at a time (1957-65) when concrete was already well established as the main medium of construction. The brainchild of Bishop Michael Browne, it was intended to be a church which would be, in his own words, ‘solid, dignified and worthy of Galway’ and hopefully of the Good Lord as well. Dedicated to Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St. Nicholas, it was designed by J.J. Robinson, over whose shoulder th...read more

Glasnevin Cemetery & Museum

Glasnevin Cemetery & Museum

Glasnevin Cemetery is the largest cemetery in Ireland and was first opened in 1832. It was established as a place where people of all religions and none could bury their dead with dignity; the cemetery has grown to become a national monument and is a vital part of the Irish Heritage story. Glasnevin Museum is a must see for anyone interested in Irish Heritage and Genealogy. The exhibitions over two floors, shows the social, historical, political and artistic development of modern Ireland through the lives of the generations buried in Ireland’s necropolis. The tour includes a visit the crypt of Daniel O Connell. Other Museum facilities include the Tower Cafe which offers a wide and varied menu and the Glasnevin Trust Shop which stocks exclusive gifts and souvenirs. Glasnevin...read more

Jerpoint Abbey

Jerpoint Abbey

Jerpoint Abbey is a ruined Cistercian abbey, founded in the second half of the 12th century, near Thomastown, County Kilkenny, Ireland. It was constructed in 1180, probably on the site of an earlier Benedictine monastery built in 1160 by Domnall Mac Gilla Patraic, King of Osraige. Jerpoint is notable for its stone carvings, including one at the tomb of Felix O'Dulany, Bishop of the Diocese of Ossory when the abbey was founded. The abbey passed into the possession of James, Earl of Ormand, in 1541 and has been a national monument and has been in the care of the Office of Public Works since 1880. Close to Jerpoint Abbey, at Newtown Jerpoint, are the ruins of a church where a local legend places the grave of Saint Nicholas! The most remarkable part is a reconstructed 15th Century sculptured c...read more

Lismore Castle & Gardens

Lismore Castle & Gardens

Lismore Castle is located in the town of Lismore, in County Waterford in Ireland. Henry II visited Lismore in 1171 and chose a site for a castle. Raymond le Gros and his Anglo-Normans ransacked the town two years later and Henry’s castle site was built upon by Prince John in 1185. These events marked a decline in influence for monastic Lismore. In 1363, the diocese was united with that of Waterford, although it retained its cathedral until the Reformation.  The castle passed to Sir Walter Raleigh in 1589 and Raleigh sold it to Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork, in 1602. He immediately set about fashioning the countryside round Lismore in the English way, with stocked deer parks, fruits orchards, fish ponds and other features of the English Lordly manor estate. In 1753, the castle pass...read more

Roundstone

Roundstone

The village of Roundstone lies on the western arm of Bertraghboy bay in Connemara, Co. Galway, 48 miles (77km) north-west of Galway city. The village is beautifully set on one of the most spectacular coastal drives in Europe overlooking the Atlantic at the foot of Errisbeg Mountain. Enjoy the views of the island-dotted Atlantic coastline and the Clifden bog from Errisbeg, a small mountain behind the village of Roundstone. The vicinity is rich in points of historical, geological and scenic interest. The remains of numerous early Christian settlements have been found on the islands along this coast. At the northern point of Inishnee, the long island across the bay from Roundstone, stand the remains of an ancient monument to Saint Brendan. From the island’s southern, point, an impressiv...read more

Connemara Celtic Crystal

Connemara Celtic Crystal

Celtic Crystal is located in the village of Moycullen, only 12 km from Galway city and situated in the heart of the Connemara Gaeltacht (an Irish language speaking area). Celtic Crystal is located on the site of the ‘old railway station’ which formed part of the famous Clifden line. Celtic Crystal was founded in 1972. This family-run business has been pioneering the incorporation of Celtic Designs and Gaelic Motifs into its ornate Irish Crystal and it is proud to claim leadership in this field.  Visitors to the factory are invited to join in a personally conducted tour of the Showroom which includes an informative and entertaining talk on the Historical and Cultural background of the uniquely crafted designs, such as the “Claddagh Ring”, Celtic designs, the &ld...read more

Galway City Museum

Galway City Museum

Situated behind the famous Spanish Arch, Galway City Museum houses exhibitions which explore aspects of the history and heritage of Galway City, focusing on the medieval town, the Claddagh village and Galway, 1800-1950. In addition to these core exhibitions, the Museum mounts temporary exhibitions and hosts a variety of exhibits from other museums, galleries and special interest groups. The highlights of the Museum are the Galway Civic Sword and Great Mace. The Civic Sword dates from the time of the Charter of King James I, which gave authority in 1610 for the carrying of such a weapon before the Mayor. The Great Mace, a massive piece of ornamental silverwork, was made in Dublin in 1710, and was presented to the town by Edward Eyre, Mayor of Galway, in 1712. The Museum is also ho...read more

Phoenix Park

Phoenix Park

The Phoenix Park is one of the largest and most magnificent city parks in Europe. A lively and entertaining exhibition on the history and wildlife of the Phoenix Park is on display in the Visitor Centre. Here visitors can receive information and enjoy a historical interpretation of the park from 3500BC to the present day. There is a special section for children which allows them to explore the wonders of forest life. Temporary exhibitions are also regularly on display in the centre. Adjoining the Visitor Centre is the fully restored Ashtown Castle, a medieval tower house that probably dates before the 17th century. The castle had been incorporated into an 18th century mansion and was 'rediscovered' when this building was demolished due to dry rot. ...read more

Cat Laughs Comedy Festival

Cat Laughs Comedy Festival

2nd - 6th June 2016Irelands favourite festival, The Cat Laughs Festival is an acclaimed comedy festival in the atmospheric setting of the charming and intimate medieval city of Kilkenny. The festival takes place on the June bank holiday weekend and was founded in 1994 in response to the burgeoning wealth of Irish comic talent. Since then the festival has grown from a small event comprising of a handful of shows to an internationally acclaimed festival. It showcases the very best in Irish and international comedy acts. The world-class programme blends renowned comic stars as well as newcomers and break-through acts. The Cat Laughs Comedy Festival attracts in excess of 30,000 visitors to Kilkenny and guarantees five days of fun and laughter!, ...read more

Butlers Chocolate Experience

Butlers Chocolate Experience

Visit the Butlers Chocolate Experience - the ultimate chocolate discovery tour in Ireland! Learn about the history of chocolate as you watch the Butlers chocolate movie in the private cinema, wander around the chocolate museum and enjoy the aroma from the chocolate gallery as you see Butlers Chocolates being made in the factory below. See up close the techniques of chocolate decoration in the experience room and then try your own hand at decorating a chocolate novelty to bring home as a treasured souvenir! Afterwards, enjoy an award winning hot chocolate in the onsite Butlers Chocolate Café or relax in the picnic area. A visit to the home of Butlers Chocolates is an experience not to be missed! ...read more

Mount Juliet

Mount Juliet

The opening of Mount Juliet paved the way, alongside the K Club, for the development of many top class parkland golf resorts in Ireland. Glasson, Mount Wolseley, Faithlegg, Adare and Esker Hills to name but a few, all followed shortly afterwards. In the summer of 1986, the reigning US Masters champion, Jack Nicklaus, was playing an exhibition match at Royal Dublin against Seve Ballesteros, when after the round Nicklaus was approached by Tim Mahony, chairman of the sponsoring company, Toyota Ireland, with regard to the design of a new course in Kilkenny. So it was that Mount Juliet was born. Five years later in July 1991, Nicklaus played another exhibition against Ireland's Christy O' Connor Sr. at the official opening of what was destined to become one of Ireland's finest parklan...read more

Connemara

Connemara

Connemara, or Ballyconneely Golf Club, as it is also known, is located between the Twelve Bens Mountains and the Atlantic Ocean, in one of the most splendid settings imaginable. According to renowned golf writer, James W. Finnegan, the golf links of Connemara is "a perfect reflection of the austere beauty that is the world of Connemara". Originally opened as an 18 hole venue, Connemara Golf Links has offered 27 holes of sublime links golf since 2001. The course was designed by renowned Irish course architect, Eddie Hackett and completed by Tom Craddock. And while Connemara Golf Club may be located on one of Ireland most westerly tips, make no mistake that it is worth the trip. Like the many other great links of the west and northwest, Connemara remains a largely underplayed (if n...read more

Poulnabrone Portal Tomb

Poulnabrone Portal Tomb

Ireland is dotted with many awe inspiring monuments, one of the most famous being the ancient Poulbrone Portal Tomb.  The name literally means “The hole of sorrows” and a visit to this famous dolmen grave will allow you a glimpse back into history .  This Dolmen has stood proudly and dominant on the burren landscape for thousands of years, the site dating back to about 2500 BC.  The history of this tomb has been well documented and records the many artefacts found during excavation work. History links this site to the legend of Diarmuid and Grainne, the ill-fated lovers who crisscrossed Ireland hiding by day and night in their attempt to evade Grainne’s pursuing scorned betrothed.    ...read more

Faithlegg

Faithlegg

Boasting a superb setting on the banks of the River Suir, Faithlegg Golf Course, designed by renowned architect, Patrick Merrigan has been cleverly moulded into a wonderful landscape of mature trees, flowing parkland and some five lakes. Situated on a 200 acre in the heart of Ireland's sunny South East, Faithlegg is the perfect inclusion as part of any golfing itinerary in the region. The superb parkland layout, with tricky doglegs, blind shots and strategically positioned sand traps, represents a stiff challenge for even the most accomplished golfers. At a championship yardage of 6,674, distance is rarely the main problem in negotiating a good score at Faithlegg. The perils of the course lie more so in its clever layout and slick contoured greens. Be assured that any round at Fa...read more

Waterford Castle

Waterford Castle

Situated on a beautiful 310 acre island in the estuary of the River Suir, Waterford Castle Golf & Country Club lies just downstream from Waterford City. The island itself boasts a long and colourful history and was a monastic settlement from the 6th to 8th centuries. During the Norman invasion of 1160, the island came under the ownership of Maurice Fitzgerald, a cousin of Strongbow and it remained the property of the Fitzgerald family until 1958. The original castle was enlarged in the 19th century and today stands as a world class hotel, while the championship golf course was opened for play in September 1992. Being an island course, Waterford Castle is certainly unique and the course is laid out on gently undulating land and offers stunning views from all parts of the cours...read more

Jerpoint Park

Jerpoint Park

Immerse yourself at the Heritage Site in Jerpoint Park, where the Lost Town of Newtown Jerpoint a deserted Medieval town dating back to 1200 AD, when it was founded near a crossing point on the River Nore not far from Thomastown and the Cistercian Jerpoint Abbey. The medieval lost town of Newtown Jerpoint is just west of the Cistercian Jerpoint Abbey, near Thomastown, County Kilkenny, Ireland. Visitors can experience estate country pursuits in a unique heritage setting from pony & trap rides, sheep dog demonstrations, fishing for salmon & trout on the River Nore, horse riding across open countryside with breath taking views, before soaking up the regal atmosphere of Belmore House Tea Rooms & sampling the delicious homemade delights. A walk through the meadows of Jerpoint Park i...read more