Overview for the 10 night Best of Ireland by Rail Tour

The best of Ireland by Rail 10 night tour is best accessed by Dublin airport.  On arrival in Dublin Airport, travel into the city and take a train from Dublin to Cork City. Cork City’s narrowed tapered streets and Georgian architecture give the city a continental feel. The city has fantastic shopping, sightseeing and entertainment opportunities and on this tour we will use it as a base to discover the seaside town of Cobh, the last port of call for millions of Irish emigrants and Blarney where the world famous Blarney Castle is located. From Cork travel west to the Kingdom County of Kerry! Here discover the amazing Ring of Kerry as well as the unspoiled Dingle Peninsula. After Killarney travel Galway where you will have ample time to explore this festival capital and see the city’s sites. A day trip to Inis Mór in the Aran Islands has been included for you, as has a day trip to the Burren and the Cliffs of Moher. The final leg of your 10 night rail tour is a 2 night stay in our capital city, Dublin. Here with your city sightseeing ticket you can see such places as Trinity College and the Book of Kells, The Guinness Storehouse and Christchurch Cathedral but to name a few places. 

Included in This Tour

  • Meet & greet at Dublin Airport with private transfer to Heuston Railway Station  
  • Train ticket from Heuston Railway Station Dublin to Cork
  • Train ticket from Cork to Killarney
  • Train ticket from Killarney to Galway
  • Train ticket from Galway to Dublin Heuston
  • 10 nights’ accommodation
  • Cork City Hop on Hop off Tour
  • Cork Cobh & Blarney Tour
  • Dublin Hop on Hop Off Sightseeing Tour Tickets
  • Ring of Kerry Coach Tour Tickets
  • Dingle Peninsula Coach Tour Tickets
  • Return Shuttle bus from Galway to the port of Rossaveal for Aran Islands Ferry 
  • Return Ferry Ticket from Rossaveal to Inis Mór
  • Day tour to the Cliffs of Moher and the Burren

Overnights for this Tour

  • Cork for 2 Nights
  • Killarney for 3 Nights 
  • Galway for 3 Nights 
  • Dublin for 2 Nights 

Tour Highlights

Cork City Gaol & Radio Museum Experience

Cork City Gaol & Radio Museum Experience

Step back in time to see what 19th/early 20th century life was like in Cork - inside and outside prison walls. Amazingly lifelike figures, furnished cells, sound effects and fascinating exhibitions allow the visitor to experience day to day life for prisoners and gaoler. Situated in the unlikely setting of the former Governor's House the "Radio Museum Experience" deals not alone with the early days of Irish & international radio broadcasting but with the impact of its invention on all our lives. Stepping inside visitors are taken back in time to the 19th century wandering through the wings of the goal. The atmosphere suggests you are accompanied by the shuffling feet of inmates, each representing their particular period in Irish history from pre-famine times to the foundation of the st...read more

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle is a medieval stronghold in Blarney, near Cork, Ireland. It is near the River Martin. The castle originally dates from before AD 1200. It was destroyed in 1446, but subsequently rebuilt by Cormac MacCarthy, the King of Munster. It is currently a partial ruin with some accessible rooms and the battlements. There are many legends as to the origin of the stone, but some say that it was the Lia Fáil—a magical stone upon which Irish kings were crowned.The Blarney Stone is a block of bluestone built into the battlements of Blarney Castle, Blarney about 8 km from Cork, Ireland. According to legend, kissing the stone endows the kisser with the gift of gab (great eloquence or skill at flattery). The stone was set into a tower of the castle in 1446. The castle ...read more

Cobh Heritage Centre

Cobh Heritage Centre

The Cobh Heritage Centre provides information on life in Ireland through the 18th and 19th centuries, the mass emigration, the Great Famine, and on how criminals were transported to Australia for petty crimes. It also has an exhibition on the history of the RMS Titanic, whose last port of call before it sank was Cóbh (then Queenstown). From 1848 - 1950 over 6 million adults and children emigrated from Ireland - over 2.5 million departed from Cobh, making it the single most important port of emigration. This exodus from Ireland was largely as a result of poverty, crop failures, the land system and a lack of opportunity. Irish emigration reached unprecedented proportions during the famine as people fled from hunger and disease. Many famine emigrants went initially to British ...read more

Aran Islands

Aran Islands

The Aran Islands are a group of three islands located at the mouth of Galway Bay, on the west coast of Ireland. The largest island is Inishmore; the middle and second-largest is Inishmaan and the smallest and most eastern is Inisheer. Irish is a spoken language on all three islands, and is the language used naming the islands and their villages and townlands. Take a short ferry ride to Inis Mor, the largest of the three Aran Islands, and island rich in the language, culture and heritage of Ireland, unique in its geology and archaeology and in its long tradition of gentle hospitality. Here is a place to sense the spirit of Gaelic Ireland, to touch the past, but with all the comforts and facilities of the present. Aran will take you back to an Ireland of Celts and Early Christians....read more

Ring of Kerry

Ring of Kerry

Admire breathtaking vistas of mountains, cliffs and beaches on Ireland’s most popular drive, the 100-mile Ring of Kerry. Starting from Killarney, heading around the Iveragh Peninsula and passing through Kenmare, Sneem, Waterville (favourite holiday spot of Charlie Chaplin that now has a statue of him to commemorate his love of the place), Cahersiveen and Killorglin. Popular points include Muckross House (near Killarney), Staigue stone fort and Derrynane House, home of Daniel O'Connell. Just south of Killarney, Ross Castle, Lough Leane, and Ladies View (a panoramic viewpoint), all located within Killarney National Park, are major attractions located along the Ring. The complete list of major attractions along the Ring of Kerry includes: Gap of Dunloe, Bog Village, Rossbeigh B...read more

Dingle Peninsula

Dingle Peninsula

There are so many things to see, to do, to explore, to experience on the Dingle Peninsula . . . from almost 2,000 archaeological sites, to more walking than you could fit into a year, to Fungie, a bottlenose dolphin who's been living at the mouth of Dingle Harbour since 1984. There is no other landscape in western Europe with the density and variety of archaeological monuments as the Dingle Peninsula. This mountainous finger of land which juts into the Atlantic Ocean has supported various tribes and populations for almost 6,000 years. Because of the peninsula's remote location, and lack of specialised agriculture, there is a remarkable preservation of over 2,000 monuments. It is impossible to visit the Dingle Peninsula and not be impressed by its archaeological heritage. When one ...read more