Overview for the 14 night Best of Ireland by Rail Tour

The best of Ireland by Rail 14 night tour is best accessed by Dublin airport.  On arrival in Dublin Airport, travel into the city and take a train from Dublin to Cork City. Cork City’s narrowed tapered streets and Georgian architecture give the city a continental feel. The city has fantastic shopping, sightseeing and entertainment opportunities and on this tour we will use it as a base to discover the seaside town of Cobh, the last port of call for millions of Irish emigrants and Blarney where the world famous Blarney Castle is located. From Cork travel west to the Kingdom County of Kerry! Here discover the amazing Ring of Kerry as well as the unspoiled Dingle Peninsula. After Killarney travel Galway where you will have ample time to explore this festival capital and see the city’s sites. A day trip to Inis Mór in the Aran Islands has been included for you, and you will have plenty of time to explore the festival city of Galway. After a one night stopover in Dublin, travel directly to Belfast by rail. In Belfast we recommend a visit to Titanic Belfast, the city’s newest and most popular museum and the Belfast murals which have become world recognised symbols of religious and political divisions. On your second day in Belfast take a tour of the Causeway Coast visiting the world famous Carrick-a-Rede Rope bridge, Bushmills Distillery and the highlight of the tour, Giant’s Causeway. After your time in Belfast travel back to Dublin by rail, for a 2 night. Here with your city sightseeing ticket you can see such places as Trinity College and the Book of Kells, The Guinness Storehouse and Christchurch Cathedral but to name a few places.

Included in This Tour-

  • Meet & greet at Dublin Airport with private transfer to Heuston Railway Station  
  • Train ticket from Heuston Railway Station Dublin to Cork
  • Train ticket from Cork to Killarney
  • Train ticket from Killarney to Galway 
  • Train ticket from Galway to Dublin Heuston 
  • Train ticket from Dublin to Belfast and return
  • 14 nights’ accommodation 
  • Cork City Hop on Hop off Tour Tickets
  • Cork Cobh & Blarney Tour
  • Dublin Hop on Hop Off Sightseeing Tour Tickets 
  • Ring of Kerry Coach Tour Tickets 
  • Dingle Peninsula Coach Tour Tickets
  • Return Shuttle bus from Galway to the port of Rossaveal for Aran Islands Ferry 
  • Return Ferry Ticket from Rossaveal to Inis Mór
  • Belfast City Hop on Hop off Tour Tickets
  • Causeway Coast Tour Tickets 
  • Cliffs of Moher and the Burren Tour Tickets 

Overnights for this Tour

  • Cork for 2 Nights
  • Killarney for 3 Nights
  • Galway for 3 Nights
  • Dublin for 1 Night
  • Belfast for 3 Nights
  • Dublin for 2 Nights 

Tour Attractions

Giants Causeway

Giants Causeway

The Giant's Causeway (or Irish: Clochán na bhFómharach) is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic eruption. It is located on the northeast coast of Northern Ireland, about two miles (3 km) north of the town of Bushmills. It was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986, and a National Nature Reserve in 1987 by the Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland. In a 2005 poll of Radio Times readers, the Giant's Causeway was named as the fourth greatest natural wonder in the United Kingdom. The tops of the columns form stepping stones that lead from the cliff foot and disappear under the sea. Most of the columns are hexagonal, although there are also some with four, five, seven and eight sides. The tallest a...read more

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge is a rope suspension bridge near, Ballintoy, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The bridge links the mainland to the tiny Carrick Island. The site is owned and maintained by the National Trust, spans twenty metres and is thirty metres above the rocks below. Today the bridge is mainly a tourist attraction, with 227,000 visitors in 2007. The bridge is now taken down every year in late October or early November, depending on weather conditions, having been put up in March. Carrick-a-rede means 'rock in the road'. It is thought salmon fishermen have been erecting bridges to the island for over 350 years. It has taken many forms over the years. In the 1970s it featured only a single handrail and large gaps between the slats. A version of the bridge, tested up...read more

Trinity College Dublin & Book of Kells

Trinity College Dublin & Book of Kells

Known as one of the oldest and most famous universities in Ireland, Trinity College Dublin is located in the centre of our capital city, Dublin, Ireland, on College Green opposite the former Irish Houses of Parliament (now a branch of the Bank of Ireland). The College was founded by Queen Elizabeth I in 1592 and among its famous graduates are Samuel Beckett, Oscar Wilde and Jonathan Swift. The campus occupies 190,000m² (47 acres), with many buildings, both old and new, ranged around large courts (known as "squares") and two playing fields. The Library of Trinity College is a copyright library for Ireland and the United Kingdom, containing over 4.5 million books and significant quantities of maps, manuscripts and music....read more

Guinness Storehouse

Guinness Storehouse

The Guinness Storehouse is located in the heart of the St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, and is, according to the Guiness Storehouse Web site, Ireland’s No. 1 international visitor attraction. Since opening in November 2000, Guinness Storehouse has attracted over 4 million visitors from every corner of the globe. The Storehouse is laid out over seven floors surrounding a glass atrium taking the shape of a pint of Guinness. On the ground floor the massive exhibit introduces you to the four ingredients; water, barley, hops and yeast, all of which combine together to make a pint of Guinness. Visitors are also introduced to the fifth and vital ingredient, Arthur Guinness himself. As the visitor moves up through the building, they next encounter an exhibition on the history of...read more

Aran Islands

Aran Islands

The Aran Islands are a group of three islands located at the mouth of Galway Bay, on the west coast of Ireland. The largest island is Inishmore; the middle and second-largest is Inishmaan and the smallest and most eastern is Inisheer. Irish is a spoken language on all three islands, and is the language used naming the islands and their villages and townlands. Take a short ferry ride to Inis Mor, the largest of the three Aran Islands, and island rich in the language, culture and heritage of Ireland, unique in its geology and archaeology and in its long tradition of gentle hospitality. Here is a place to sense the spirit of Gaelic Ireland, to touch the past, but with all the comforts and facilities of the present. Aran will take you back to an Ireland of Celts and Early Christians....read more

Ring of Kerry

Ring of Kerry

Admire breathtaking vistas of mountains, cliffs and beaches on Ireland’s most popular drive, the 100-mile Ring of Kerry. Starting from Killarney, heading around the Iveragh Peninsula and passing through Kenmare, Sneem, Waterville (favourite holiday spot of Charlie Chaplin that now has a statue of him to commemorate his love of the place), Cahersiveen and Killorglin. Popular points include Muckross House (near Killarney), Staigue stone fort and Derrynane House, home of Daniel O'Connell. Just south of Killarney, Ross Castle, Lough Leane, and Ladies View (a panoramic viewpoint), all located within Killarney National Park, are major attractions located along the Ring. The complete list of major attractions along the Ring of Kerry includes: Gap of Dunloe, Bog Village, Rossbeigh B...read more