Scottish & Irish Gold Tour (15 day/14 night or 16 day/15 night)

Your Escorted Coach Tour of Ireland Includes

15 days/14 nights/26 meals or 16 days/15 nights/27 meals

  • Roundtrip group airport transfers when you book our flights - $30 per person fee applies to land only booking
  • Sightseeing by luxury coach
  • Professional tour director
  • 15 nights in hotels listed
  • Full breakfast daily (B) except on day 1
  • 10 dinners (D) including
    - Scottish Evening in Edinburgh
    - Jarvey's Irish Night
    - O’Connell’s Restaurant in Dublin
    - 7 table d'hote dinners
  • 3 lunches (L)
  • Welcome get-together drink
  • Tours of Glasgow and Edinburgh
  • Loch Lomond scenic cruise
  • Ferries to the Isle of Skye and from Scotland to Ireland and across River Shannon
  • Blair Athol Distillery whisky tasting and tour
  • Reserved seats for Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo on July 31 to August 21 departures
  • Killary Fjord catamaran cruise
  • Sheepdog trials in Scotland and Ireland
  • Horse-drawn jaunting car ride in Killarney
  • Irish coffee and music session at the Marine Bar in Dungarvan
  • Walking tours of Waterford and Galway
  • Dublin open-top bus tour with a visit to Guinness Storehouse or General Post Office
  • Visits and admissions to Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum, Inveraray Castle, Clan Donald Centre at Armadale Castle, Culloden Battlefield Visitor Centre, Blair Castle, Glamis Castle, St Andrews, Edinburgh Castle, Titanic Belfast, Clonmacnoise Monastic Site, Kylemore Abbey, Cliffs of Moher, Muckross House & Gardens, Skellig Experience, Blarney Castle, Blarney Woollen Mills, House of Waterford Crystal and waterford's Medieval Museum
  • Headsets for walking tours
  • Deluxe carry-on backpack, ticket wallet, luggage tags & strap
  • All local taxes, hotel service charges & porterage for one suitcase per person
  • Free Wi-Fi on coaches and in hotel lobbies

Your Hotels

Stay at the following (or similar):

  • Glasgow Marriott Hotel,Glasgow (1 night)
  • Isles of Glencoe Hotel,Ballachulish (1 night)
  • The Newton Hotel, Nairn (1 night)
  • Atholl Palace Hotel, Pitlochry (2 nights)
  • Macdonald Holyrood Hotel, Edinburgh (2 nights)
  • Royal Marine Hotel, Dun Laoghaire, Dublin (1 night)
  • Radisson Blu Hotel,Galway (2 nights)
  • Malton Hotel, Killarney (2 nights)
  • Granville Hotel,Waterford (1 night)
  • Doubletree by Hilton Hotel, Dublin (1 or 2 nights)

Tour Hightlights

Cliffs of Moher

Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher (Irish: Aillte an Mhothair, lit. cliffs of the ruin, also known as the Cliffs of Coher from the Irish: Mhothair) are located in the parish of Liscannor at the south-western edge of The Burren area near Doolin, which is located in County Clare, Ireland. The cliffs rise 120 meters (394 ft) above the Atlantic Ocean at Hag's Head, and reach their maximum height of 214 meters (702 ft) just north of O'Brien's Tower, eight kilometres away. The cliffs boast one of Ireland's most spectacular views. On a clear day the Aran Islands are visible in Galway Bay, as are the valleys and hills of Connemara. O'Brien's Tower is a round stone tower at the approximate midpoint of the cliffs. It was built by Sir Cornelius O'Brien, a descendant of Ireland's High King Brian Boru, in 18...read more

Clonmacnoise

Clonmacnoise

The monastery of Clonmacnoise (meaning  Meadow of the Sons of Nós) is situated in County Offaly, Ireland on the River Shannon south of Athlone. It was visited by the Pope in 1979. The site can be visited for a fee, via an Interpretative Centre. Clonmacnoise was founded in 546 by Ciarán, a young man from Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon. Until the 9th century it had close associations with the kings of Connacht. The strategic location of the monastery helped it become a major centre of religion, learning, craftsmanship, and trade. The site includes the ruins of a cathedral, seven churches (10th -13th century), two round towers, three high crosses and the largest collection of Early Christian graveslabs. The site also includes original high crosses. Amongst the many remains at C...read more

Guinness Storehouse

Guinness Storehouse

The Guinness Storehouse is located in the heart of the St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, and is, according to the Guiness Storehouse Web site, Ireland’s No. 1 international visitor attraction. Since opening in November 2000, Guinness Storehouse has attracted over 4 million visitors from every corner of the globe. The Storehouse is laid out over seven floors surrounding a glass atrium taking the shape of a pint of Guinness. On the ground floor the massive exhibit introduces you to the four ingredients; water, barley, hops and yeast, all of which combine together to make a pint of Guinness. Visitors are also introduced to the fifth and vital ingredient, Arthur Guinness himself. As the visitor moves up through the building, they next encounter an exhibition on the history of...read more

Killary Harbour

Killary Harbour

Killary Harbour / An Caoláire Rua is Ireland's only "fjord". While it is known widely as Ireland's only fjord, it is disputed that it was actually formed by glaciers. It forms a partial border between counties Galway and Mayo. It is 16 kilometres long and in the centre it is over 45 metres deep. On its northern shore lies the mountain of Mweelrea, 817 metres high. Directly opposite, on the southern, Galway side and near the mouth of the fjord, lies the hamlet of Rossroe and the former An Óige youth hostel, now disused. This building was itself converted and extended for the purpose and was formerly a modest house which was used by Ludwig Wittgenstein, the famous philosopher, as a quiet place to write shortly after World War II. A plaque to this effect was unveiled ...read more

Kylemore Abbey

Kylemore Abbey

Visit Kylemore Abbey, a 19th century mansion with an exquisite chapel and reception rooms. The Abbey is the oldest of the Irish Benedictine Abbeys. It is a Benedictine monastery founded in 1920 on the grounds of Kylemore Castle, in Connemara, County Galway, Ireland. The abbey was founded for Benedictine Nuns who fled Belgium in World War I. At Kylemore, the nuns opened their international boarding school and established a day school for local girls. They also ran a farm and guesthouse; the guesthouse was closed after a devastating fire in 1959. A section of the Abbey (the enclosure) is retained strictly for the nuns’ use and is not open to the public; here the nuns devote themselves to their monastic life of prayer and work. Originally called Kylemore Castle, it was built be...read more

Muckross House, Gardens & Traditional Farms

Muckross House, Gardens & Traditional Farms

This nineteenth century Victorian mansion is set against the stunning beauty of Killarney National Park. The house stands close to the shores of Muckross Lake, one of Killarney's three lakes, famed world wide for their splendour and beauty. As a focal point within Killarney National Park, Muckross House is the ideal base from which to explore this landscape.Muckross House was built for Henry Arthur Herbert and his wife, the water-colourist Mary Balfour Herbert. This was actually the fourth house that successive generations of the Herbert family had occupied at Muckross over a period of almost two hundred years. William Burn, the well-known Scottish architect, was responsible for its design. Building commenced in 1839 and was completed in 1843.Originally it was intended that Muckross House ...read more

Ring of Kerry

Ring of Kerry

Admire breathtaking vistas of mountains, cliffs and beaches on Ireland’s most popular drive, the 100-mile Ring of Kerry. Starting from Killarney, heading around the Iveragh Peninsula and passing through Kenmare, Sneem, Waterville (favourite holiday spot of Charlie Chaplin that now has a statue of him to commemorate his love of the place), Cahersiveen and Killorglin. Popular points include Muckross House (near Killarney), Staigue stone fort and Derrynane House, home of Daniel O'Connell. Just south of Killarney, Ross Castle, Lough Leane, and Ladies View (a panoramic viewpoint), all located within Killarney National Park, are major attractions located along the Ring. The complete list of major attractions along the Ring of Kerry includes: Gap of Dunloe, Bog Village, Rossbeigh B...read more

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle is a medieval stronghold in Blarney, near Cork, Ireland. It is near the River Martin. The castle originally dates from before AD 1200. It was destroyed in 1446, but subsequently rebuilt by Cormac MacCarthy, the King of Munster. It is currently a partial ruin with some accessible rooms and the battlements. There are many legends as to the origin of the stone, but some say that it was the Lia Fáil—a magical stone upon which Irish kings were crowned.The Blarney Stone is a block of bluestone built into the battlements of Blarney Castle, Blarney about 8 km from Cork, Ireland. According to legend, kissing the stone endows the kisser with the gift of gab (great eloquence or skill at flattery). The stone was set into a tower of the castle in 1446. The castle ...read more

Waterford Crystal Centre

Waterford Crystal Centre

The iconic House of Waterford Crystal in the heart of Waterford city, comprises of a brand new manufacturing facility, visitor centre and retail outlet. Visitors can enjoy all aspects of the manufacturing process through the factory tour and learn about both historical and contemporary production techniques through direct interaction with the craftsmen and the audiovisual materials. The manufacturing facility contains a brand new continuous melt tank furnace that has been tailor-made to Waterford Crystal’s specifications, and produces two tonnes of molten crystal every day, which produces 45,000 high-end crystal pieces per year. It uses leading edge technology to deliver molten crystal of the highest quality for skilled master blowers to hand-shape and hand-blow into Water...read more

Inveraray Castle

Inveraray Castle

Inveraray Castle is the ancestral home of the Duke of Argyll, Chief of the Clan Campbell The ancient Royal Burgh of Inveraray lies 60 miles north west of Glasgow and the castle stands proud on the shores of Loch Fyne , Scotland’s longest sea loch since the 1400s. The castle rises grey-green above its park and is stunning against the ruggedness of the highland scenery....read more

Urquhart Castle

Urquhart Castle

Urquhart Castle is an impressive structure despite its ruinous state situated on a headland overlooking the deep waters of Loch Ness and is surrounded by some of the Highlands’ most stunning scenery. Urquhart Castle saw much military action and during the long War of Independence against England, Urquhart was seized by Edward I and then later by the supporters of Robert the Bruce....read more

St. Andrews

St. Andrews

St Andrews is a former royal burgh on the east coast of Fife in Scotland, named after Saint Andrew the Apostle. The town is home to the University of St Andrews, the third oldest university in the English-speaking world and the oldest in Scotland. The University is an integral part of the burgh, and during term time students make up approximately one third of the town's population.There has been an important church in St Andrews since at least the 8th century, and a bishopric since at least the 11th century. The settlement grew to the west of St Andrews cathedral with the southern side of the Scores to the north and the Kinness burn to the south. The burgh soon became the ecclesiastical capital of Scotland, a position which was held until the Scottish Reformation. The famous cathedral, the...read more

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond is a freshwater loch lying on the Highland Boundary Fault, often considered the boundary between the lowlands of Central Scotland and the Highlands. Its surface area is 71 km2 (27 sq mi), and it has a volume of 2.6 km3 (0.62 cu mi). Of all lochs and lakes in Great Britain, it is the largest by surface area, and the second largest (after Loch Ness) by water volume. The loch contains thirty or more islands (depending on the water level). Several of them are large by the standards of British bodies of freshwater. Inchmurrin, for example, is the largest island in a body of freshwater in the British Isles. As in Loch Tay, several of the islands appear to be crannogs, artificial islands built in prehistoric periods.English travel writer, H.V. Morton wrote: "What a large part of Loch ...read more