Best of the Wild Atlantic Way (10 Night)

Immerse yourself in one of the top driving routes in the world and discover the Wild Magnificent Ireland of your dreams!

This Best of the Wild Atlantic Way Tour is accessed through Shannon airport and is a 10 night tour based on the highlights of the spectacular coastal route that is the Wild Atlantic Way. The Wild Atlantic Way driving tour is the longest defined coastal route in the world and stretches for 2500km along Ireland’s western seaboard.

Along Ireland’s ‘Wild Atlantic Way’ where the Gaelic culture thrives and much of the population still speaks Irish as its first language, it is the people that might distract you from the wonderful sights to be seen. These warm-hearted and friendly communities that dot the landscape will welcome you with open arms and regale you with stories and the history of their areas.

By day enjoy the magnificent scenery including, the Cliffs of Moher, Aran Islands, Killary Harbour and the stark Burren Landscape of County Clare as well as the Dingle Peninsula in Kerry. By night rest your weary bones by a roaring turf fire, accompanied by superb traditional Irish music in one of a myriad of welcoming pubs that dot the Wild Atlantic Way.

This tour includes a night in Galway city which although a world away from the small coastal villages you have visited, is the perfect way to end your tour. Galway is the only large city where you can hear Irish spoken on the streets and is a vibrant city known for its selection of eclectic shops, pubs and restaurants.

Overnights for this tour:

  • Kinsale for 2 nights
  • Kenmare for 1 night
  • Dingle for 2 nights
  • West Clare for 1 night
  • Connemara for 1 night
  • Westport, Mayo for 2 nights
  • Galway for 1 night

Your Accommodation Options:

  • Superior & First Class Hotels
  • Luxury Accommodation & Service in our 4-Star Country Manor Houses
  • Deluxe Accommodation in our 4 & 5 Star Irish Castles
  • Our Recommended & Handpicked B&B's, all rooms have private bath facilities
  • Any Combination of the above

Tour Highlights

Kinsale

Kinsale

The medieval town of Kinsale is not just about food, it’s also about traditional bars, beautiful buildings, narrow streets, shops and galleries and lots of activities on land and sea. You'll find Kinsale's not just a place - it's more a state of mind! Drive to Kinsale, a delightful old town on a narrow inlet of the sea. Formerly a fishing and merchant town, today it is popular for sailing and gourmet food. Join a local guide for a short walking tour to see some historic places. Start at Charles Fort to understand the importance of Kinsale’s location for trading and defense and then walk around some of the old streets. Kinsale can easily claim its place amongst Ireland's most historic locations for this has been a centre of population, commerce, trade and fishing far beyond memo...read more

Kenmare

Kenmare

Kenmare (Irish: An Neidín) is a small town in the south of County Kerry, Ireland. The Irish name for the town 'An Neidín' translates into English as 'The Little Nest'. The name Kenmare is the anglicised form of Ceann Mhara "head of the sea", which refers to the furthest point inland reached by the sea. Kenmare is located at the head of Kenmare Bay sometimes called the Kenmare River (An Ribhéar) where the Roughty River (An Ruachtach) flows into the sea, and at the junction of the Iveragh Peninsula and the Beara Peninsula. The traditional Irish name of the bay was Inbhear Scéine from the celtic inver, which is recorded in the 11th Century narrative Lebor Gabála Érenn as the arrival point of the mythological Irish ancestor Partholón. It is also...read more

Dingle

Dingle

Dingle is a harbour town set on the Dingle Peninsula in South-West of Ireland. The town also is gateway to the Gaeltacht where Gaelic is the first language. This unique town is full of surprises and waiting to be discovered. The town is renowned for its restaurants, most of which offers excellent local seafood. There is a wide variety of restaurants in Dingle, from burgers and chips to fine dining. Most places today have several vegetarian selections in their menus.  Dingle has long been well supplies with pubs, in recent years the number has hovered around 52. There are large, modern pubs and pubs so small that five’s a crowd. At night, the town comes to life as the strains of the bodhran, tin whistle, the fiddle and the accordion fill the night air as the Guinness flows. ...read more

Limerick

Limerick

Limerick is located in the Mid-West Region of Ireland and is also part of the province of Munster. Limerick City is the hub and capital of the Shannon Region and the 3rd largest city in the Republic of Ireland. Its colourful and fascinating history is evident everywhere and proudly maintained. From the times more than a thousand years ago, when the Vikings first developed it, to the present day, Limerick has been the greatest seaport of the west of Ireland. Its magnificent river, the lordly Shannon, has been part of one of Ireland's oldest routes. In early medieval time’s hermits, heroes, soldiers, raiders, students and pilgrims, all travelled along this 'water highway' from the Atlantic Ocean through to the Irish midlands and beyond. Buildings ancient and historical, middle-aged an...read more

Aillwee Cave and the Burren Birds of Prey Centre

Aillwee Cave and the Burren Birds of Prey Centre

The unique karst landscape of the Burren Region is home to Aillwee Cave and the Burren Birds of Prey, located in Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare. This stunning creation of nature was formed by the melt waters of a prehistoric ice age. The cave, carved out of limestone, cuts one third of a mile into the heart of the mountains. The story of Aillwee Cave began millions of years ago when streams sinking underground on Aillwee Mountain started dissolving channels through the lines of weakness in the limestone. About one million years ago the ice age began and from then until fifteen thousand years ago Ireland's climate alternated between arctic coldness and warmer periods, freezing and melting, freezing and melting over the centuries. This melting water roared and crashed its way through the Aillwee Cave greatly enlarging the passage and bringing with it large quantities of sand and silts which are still present in the inner cave. The earliest history of the cave is preserved in its roof. Aillwee is one of the most ancient caves in the Burren and perhaps in Ireland. ...read more

Connemara

Connemara

Connemara, or Ballyconneely Golf Club, as it is also known, is located between the Twelve Bens Mountains and the Atlantic Ocean, in one of the most splendid settings imaginable. According to renowned golf writer, James W. Finnegan, the golf links of Connemara is "a perfect reflection of the austere beauty that is the world of Connemara". Originally opened as an 18 hole venue, Connemara Golf Links has offered 27 holes of sublime links golf since 2001. The course was designed by renowned Irish course architect, Eddie Hackett and completed by Tom Craddock. And while Connemara Golf Club may be located on one of Ireland most westerly tips, make no mistake that it is worth the trip. Like the many other great links of the west and northwest, Connemara remains a largely underplayed (if n...read more

Westport

Westport

Situated on the shores of Clew Bay in the shadow of Croagh Patrick, Ireland's famous holy mountain, Westport Golf Club is the finest parkland golf course in the west and northwest of Ireland. The club itself was instituted in 1908 and had three separate locations prior to moving to its present site at Carrowholly in 1973. During the 1960's, Lord Sligo of Westport House Estate presented a proposal to the members of the golf club, to build a championship course on his estate. The offer was accepted and with financial assistance from the Irish Tourist Board, the dream became reality. Renowned architect Fred Hawtree, who also designed the New Course at St. Andrews, designed the golf course at Westport. Upon first viewing the site, Hawtree commented: "the nature of the terrain part in...read more

Galway Cathedral

Galway Cathedral

Galway Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St. Nicholas. Perhaps with the hint of a nod to Brunelleschi’s Duomo in Florence, the large octagonal dome of Galway’s Catholic Cathedral rises above the roofs of the medieval city. Providing a full side view to those crossing a bridge over the Corrib, it was the last major stone church to be built in Ireland, at a time (1957-65) when concrete was already well established as the main medium of construction. The brainchild of Bishop Michael Browne, it was intended to be a church which would be, in his own words, ‘solid, dignified and worthy of Galway’ and hopefully of the Good Lord as well. Dedicated to Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St. Nicholas, it was designed by J.J. Robinson, over whose shoulder th...read more